Reintroducing the 4DFramework blog (NaBloPoMo Day 1)

We are far more than zero-dimensional people, so why do we think that way?  

Greetings, and thank you for checking out my NaBloPoMo (National Blog Posting Month) project.  As a rookie still participating on my first Blogging 201 course, posting an article daily for November will be a challenge, but after randomly addressing topical issues over the first couple of months of posts, I consider this an opportunity for me to better introduce my work to the blogging community and anyone else who stumbles upon my website.  My objective will be to use these daily posts to outline the purpose of this blog, with its attention to provoking a discussion about the definition of public interest and the framework I have developed to help assess and promote an understanding of my concept of this subject, along with its practical applications.

You can check out my “About” page for a quick introduction of these ideas, plus there’s also the three personal goals I’ve posted as an early Blogging 201 exercise.  Beyond that, I’ll just reiterate why I refer to this public interest focused concept as a Four Dimensional Framework.

This begins with the understanding that “better together” is not just a catchphrase.  I aim to convince you, my audience, that there is a pattern and structure to our behavior that demonstrates the relevance of whether we all view and approach our coexistence merely as individuals or as part of an integrated and ever dynamic whole.  To expand the comprehension of our lives beyond thinking of them as simple isolated islands to themselves.

First is to remember that in geometry, zero dimensions is a point which is how many treat their view of society – a dispersal and meandering set of points with no significant interaction or influence, an approach that influences relevant social subjects like economics and public policy.

This is in contrast to our experience by which we coexist and interact to achieve together that which could never be done alone.  This is why we should view lives like our physical reality –  rather than zero dimensions, there are four which are termed as length, breadth, depth, and time, a measure of change.  This framework utilizes this perspective in the form of these four categories:

4DF Dimensions

  • Length – The Relational Dimension: the lines that connect and define our relationship to one another.
  • Breadth – The Scope Dimension: the geographic, temporal, social, and ecological space within which we exist and function.
  • Depth – The Awareness Dimension: the knowledge and capability we possess and utilize.
  • Time/Change – The Dynamic Dimension: The outcomes that materialize through our coexistence and interaction as opposed to operating in isolation.

Thanks for checking me out!  I hope you will continue following me as I crunch through the NaBloPoMo challenge and beyond.  For those of you living under Daylight Savings Time, enjoy the long weekend.  Just slightly longer, but given the work ahead, I’ll take it!

 

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Posted in 4D Framework themes
2 comments on “Reintroducing the 4DFramework blog (NaBloPoMo Day 1)
  1. […] but haven’t yet cohesively written them down for my blog which is why I decided to join in.  The objectives that I laid out in my first #NaBloPoMo post allowed me to plan a schedule of posts in advance for the first half of the […]

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  2. […] is what is being represented in my 4dframework logo and the graphic below that I showed in my NaBloPoMo Day 1 post.  The lines each represent a self-to-broad interest continuum with the broad interest ends, I call […]

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